Taiwanese singer-songwriter Zooey Wonder’s U.S. Visa revoked, appearance at SXSW 2017 cancelled


In an unprecedented move, on the 11th of March Taiwanese indie singer-songwriter Zooey Wonder joined the ranks of artists heading to SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas who had been denied entry into the U.S. when her ESTA was revoked at the last minute upon arrival at the airport.

One the largest international festival of its kind, each year artists and creative types flock to the event for an opportunity to showcase their works. However, this year US President Donald Trump‘s travel ban, nicknamed ‘the muslim ban’ for its effect on those with nationality or dual nationality of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria or Yemen has caused a stir.

Slated to perform at the Taiwan Beats showcase which has been held at SXSW for the past two years, Wonder was meant to perform alongside new and promising artists such as Hello Nico, Matzka, DJ Question Mark and Jade Eyes.

It was reported by Wonder’s social media that her ESTA visa was revoked as she was checking into her flight in Taipei, Taiwan.

Due to the AIT (American Institute in Taiwan) being closed on the weekends,  Wonder has of yet not received an explanation for why her visa was revoked.

Although Taiwan is not on the list of countries who are affected by this travel ban, Blow Media has hinted that the quick succession of visa revokes, some of which directly associated to Trump’s stringent policies might be the case for Wonder.

Of the dramatic turn of events, Wonder took to her Facebook page saying:

“Although at the time I was really disappointed, but after returning from the airport and resting for a day, I’ve got my focus back and am preparing now for the next two concert tours. Thank you everyone for your care, this album and concert will be great on your ears and eyes. Other than there being many surprising special guests, you can also expect many different performance formats, hope everyone can see my perseverance and growth in the last few years”.

This article was adapted from a post originally appearing on Asian Pop Weekly.