Get to know J-Pop band Passepied

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Upon meeting with Japanese pop sensations Passepied at the Golden Melody Awards Festival Showcase last week, something about them struck me as different and unique. Apart from being one of the more respectful artists I interviewed during the festival, their performance blew me away with their eclectic and vintage musical influences, ranging from music from the 70s all the way up to 2000s pop.

With a stage personality that incorporated passion from the instrumentalists and delicacy in movements from the adorable Natsuki, you won’t be able to truly get your head around their special sound on the first go, but I promise that if you take another listen, you’ll be head over heels for them soon enough. Although I am sure many Australians such as myself are as of yet unfamiliar with their songs, their music is some serious triple J stuff that will titillate your earbuds. So that’s what this interview is for; to tell their story, and to urge you listeners to delve into the weird and wonderful world of Passepied.

You guys have been in the industry for so long, do you still get nervous before you get on the stage?

Natsuki: The process of preparing in the lead-up to the performance is instead more nerve-wracking, but once you get onto the stage, that feeling of nervousness disappears.

Perhaps Australian audiences are not as familiar with Passepied’s music. If you meet someone who would like to get to know more about your music, how would you describe your musical genre and attitude to them?

Haneda: Our music is within the new-wave genre, but it also incorporates Japanese culture into it, putting these things together in a fusion.

If you could pick any musician to work with, who would you choose? 

There is this band which sings and performs in the water called Water Sonic. We wish to perform with them.

Your band name ‘Passepied’ is pretty special. How did you come up with this name?

Haneda: I come from a classical music background, and brought everyone together, forming this band. As for the origin of the band’s name, I really like Debussy, this Classical music composer. One of Debussy’s songs is called “Passepied”, so I gave the band this kind of name.

If you didn’t go into music as a career, what do you think you would be doing right now?

Katsuko: I would probably be a farmer, because my family background is in farming.

Takuya: I hope that I could become a professional baseball player.

Yoshikuni: Possibly a carpenter, or something like a construction worker.

Natsuki: I really like drawing so I hope to become an artist.

Haneda: Primary school teacher

When you are creating or composing, what kinds of things bring you inspiration?

Haneda: As I am in charge of composing, I mainly absorb things to do with entertainment. For example, I will watch movies, musicals and read, and might also go to museums to take a look. Fun things that are nearby give me inspiration.

Natsuki: I will go and read a lot of books and then allow myself to enter the world of the book, allowing the book’s content to revolve in her mind, using these things to give me inspiration to write.

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Hello Asia is an Australian platform. Has Passepied come before? What is your impression of Australia?

We haven’t been before. (When asked about impressions) UV rays, the Sydney Opera House, Kangaroos, and nature at large.

Is there anything you’d like to say to fans in Australia?

Natsuki: Actually I don’t know when we will be able to go to Australia to perform but we hope it will be in the near future. Perhaps there are a lot of people in Australia who don’t know who we are but we hope that when we perform we can take this opportunity to allow more people and fans to hear more of our music, this is our greatest wish.